You Are Invited–PAKISTAN-INDIA TRADE: WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE? WHAT DOES IT MATTER?

                 

The Wilson Center’s Asia Program and Program on America and the Global Economy along with the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan Present:

 Pakistan-India Trade:

What Needs to be Done? What Does it Matter?

  Monday, April 23, 2012, 9:45 A.M.- 4:15 P.M.

5th Floor Conference Room


CONFERENCE AGENDA

9:45     Registration and coffee

10:00   Introduction

Robert M. Hathaway, director, Asia Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

10:15   Panel I: Moving forward on MFN

Ijaz Nabi, visiting professor, Lahore University of Management Sciences, and Pakistan country director, International Growth Centre

A view from Pakistan

Sunil Kant Munjal, Chairman, Hero Corporate Service (invited)

A view from India

Ishrat Hussain, dean and director, Institute of Business Administration (Karachi)

Dissenting views             

12:30   Luncheon

1:00     Luncheon keynote address

Zafar Mahmood, commerce secretary, government of Pakistan

2:00     Panel II: Broadening the debate

Amin Hashwani, founder, Pakistan-India CEO’s Business Council

Social issues, civil society, and security

Nisha Taneja, professor, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)

Non-tariff barriers, infrastructure deficiencies, and high transaction costs

Ejaz Ghani, economic adviser for South Asia, World Bank

Regional implications

4:15     Adjournment

 

*RSVPs are required. Please RSVP to asia@wilsoncenter.org*

 Please allow time for security procedures when you arrive at the Wilson Center. A photo ID is required for entry. The Center is located in the southeast wing of the Ronald Reagan Building, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC. Please see http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions for complete information. The closest Metro station is Federal Triangle on the blue or orange line. Parking is available in the Reagan Building basement, but because of security delays we recommend coming by cab or Metro.
 

This conference has been made possible through the generosity

 of the Fellowship Fund for Pakistan.

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You are Invited – Book Discussion: World Under Pressure

The Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE)

Presents a Book Launch:

World Under Pressure:

How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

Featuring:  Author, Carl Dahlman, Henry R. Luce Associate Professor

School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Moderated by: Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Carl J. Dahlman is an Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at the World Bank. At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching explore how the rise of the BRICs are affecting global power, and  how rapid advances in science, technology and information are influencing the growth prospects of nations  and economic relations in a rapidly globalizing world. At the World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as Senior Advisor to the World Bank Institute and managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) Program starting in 1999. He has conducted extensive analytical work on major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has co-authored eight books on the development strategy of different countries and many chapters and articles on competitiveness, education and skills, and innovation.  His newest book is The World under Pressure: How China and India are influencing the Global Economy and Environment, published by Stanford University Press in the Fall of 2011. He is currently doing research on the global innovation system which provides a broad perspective on the forces shaping competition and cooperation across nations including governments, transnational corporations, and universities.  Dr. Dahlman earned a B.A, magna cum laude from the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University (1972) and a PhD in economics from Yale University (1979).

Friday, December 9, 2011   3:00-4:30 pm.

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

RSVP (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Posted by: PAGE Staff

You are Invited – World Under Pressure: How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

The Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE)

Presents a Book Launch:

World Under Pressure:

How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

Featuring:  Author, Carl Dahlman, Henry R. Luce Associate Professor

School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Moderated by: Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Carl J. Dahlman is an Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at the World Bank. At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching explore how the rise of the BRICs are affecting global power, and  how rapid advances in science, technology and information are influencing the growth prospects of nations  and economic relations in a rapidly globalizing world. At the World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as Senior Advisor to the World Bank Institute and managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) Program starting in 1999. He has conducted extensive analytical work on major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has co-authored eight books on the development strategy of different countries and many chapters and articles on competitiveness, education and skills, and innovation.  His newest book is The World under Pressure: How China and India are influencing the Global Economy and Environment, published by Stanford University Press in the Fall of 2011. He is currently doing research on the global innovation system which provides a broad perspective on the forces shaping competition and cooperation across nations including governments, transnational corporations, and universities.  Dr. Dahlman earned a B.A, magna cum laude from the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University (1972) and a PhD in economics from Yale University (1979).

Friday, December 9, 2011   3:00-4:30 pm.

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

RSVP (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Posted by: PAGE Staff

Event Summary – The Eagle and The Elephant

The following is an event summary from an event hosted by the Asia Program and the Program on America and the Global Economy of the Woodrow Wilson Center.

According to Raymond E. Vickery, economic engagement—trade, investment, lending, aid, and macroeconomic cooperation—constitutes the “engine” of strategic engagement. This theme is underscored repeatedly in Vickery’s new book, The Eagle and the Elephant: Strategic Aspects of U.S.-India Economic Engagement, which was launched by the Asia Program at a June 1 event. Vickery, senior director of Albright Stonebridge Group and of counsel to Hogan Lovells, asserted that the U.S.-India strategic relationship, which he described as “at its highest point ever,” would not be where it is today were it not for the economic ties cultivated by the two countries over the last two decades. This economic engagement has influenced not only defense cooperation, but also political collaboration on a range of transnational issues. However, Vickery warned that economic engagement gone wrong can negatively affect relations between the world’s two largest democracies.

Vickery’s book (much of it written while he was a Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar in 2008-09) features eight case studies of U.S.-India economic engagement, ranging from defense to food security and economic development. Vickery examines the U.S.-India civil nuclear initiative as a primary example of the interaction between economic engagement and strategic cooperation. The Hyde Act—passed by Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2006—authorized civil nuclear cooperation between India and the United States, and demonstrated Washington’s commitment to a deeper strategic relationship with New Delhi. Yet in fact, Vickery argued, the Hyde Act evolved from earlier efforts to strengthen bilateral economic relations. Soon after September 11, 2001, he explained, New Delhi and Washington formed a High Technology Cooperation Group, which sought to increase trade in high-tech goods. This arrangement led to the Next Steps in Strategic Partnership initiative, which was launched by India and the United States in 2004. Then, in July 2005, the two countries’ leaders announced a formal agreement to pursue a civil nuclear accord.

Another of the book’s case studies focuses on reactions to terrorism. On December 13, 2001, gunmen attacked India’s Parliament in an attempt to decapitate the country’s political leadership. Tensions between India and Pakistan quickly escalated, and fears abounded that the nations would go to war. However, said Vickery, U.S.-Indian economic engagement served as an “ameliorating” factor. General Electric—a U.S. firm with a strong presence in India—and other corporations were concerned about the disruptive effects of hostilities. U.S and Indian companies conferred, thereby setting in motion a series of events that eventually led to war being averted. In his book, Vickery regrets that some diplomatic analysts give short shrift to New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman’s wry yet apt assessment: “That cease-fire was brought to us not by [Secretary of State] General [Colin] Powell but by General Electric.” Read more of this post

You are Invited – The Eagle and the Elephant: Strategic Aspects of the U.S. – India Economic Engagement

THE ASIA PROGRAM AND THE PROGRAM ON AMERICA AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

Present a Book Launch for:

The Eagle and the Elephant:

Strategic Aspects of U.S.-India Economic Engagement

Wednesday, June 1, 2011     4:00 – 5:30 pm

5th Floor Conference Room

Speaker: Raymond E. Vickery Jr.

From the book publisher: “The Eagle and the Elephant shows how economic engagement directly affects how theUnited States cooperates withIndia on strategic issues. Through case studies of major efforts, including civil nuclear cooperation, services outsourcing, antiterrorism, and electricity generation and the environment, Raymond E. Vickery Jr. presents both successful and unsuccessful instances of complex collaborations between the two nations…He offers new insight into the interplay of legislative and executive branch officials, policy proponents, business and nonprofit organizations, and activists.”

About the speaker: Raymond E. Vickery Jr. is senior director of Albright Stonebridge Group and of counsel to Hogan Lovells. He served as aWilsonCenter public policy scholar in 2008-09 and has 40 years of experience withIndia.  For the past 15 years, he has been deeply involved in the strategic aspects of U.S.-India economic engagement. Several years ago he played a leading role in the passage of the U.S.-India civil nuclear deal. Earlier, he served as assistant secretary of commerce for trade development in the first Bill Clinton administration, and was given responsibility forIndia while carrying out the Commerce Department’s Big Emerging Markets initiative. Since leaving government service, he has worked for severalU.S. companies trading and investing inIndia.

Posted by: PAGE Staff

You are Invited: India’s Quest for a Lower Carbon Footprint

THE ASIA PROGRAM and THE GLOBAL ENERGY INITIATIVE

present:

India’s Quest for a Lower Carbon Footprint

Tuesday, May 10, 2011    4:00 pm–5:30 pm

6th Floor Board Room

Featuring: Ajay Shankar

FICCI Scholar, WoodrowWilsonCenter

Media organizations are requested to contact the Asia Program in advance at 202/691-4020 or asia@wilsoncenter.org. Otherwise, RSVPs are NOT necessary. Please allow for routine security procedures when you arrive at the Center. A photo ID is required for entry. The Center is located in the southeast wing of the Ronald Reagan Building, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. The closest Metro station is Federal Triangle on the blue and orange lines. For detailed directions, please visit the Center’s website, www.wilsoncenter.org/directions.

Posted by: PAGE Staff