Invitation: Public-Private Partnerships Powering Entrepreneurs and Innovators

WWC_page_C_v1The Program on America and the Global Economy and the Kauffman Foundation Present:

Public-Private Partnerships Powering Entrepreneurs and Innovators

Friday, November 1, 2013

2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Joseph and Claire Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

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Keynote:

Jacques Gansler, Roger C. Lipitz Chair in Public Policy and Private Enterprise, University of Maryland 

Panelists: 

Stephen Campbell, Economist, Economics Analysis Office, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Sujai Shivakumar, Deputy Director, Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy, National Academies 

Sue Gander, Director, Environment, Energy & Transportation Division, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices

Moderator: 

Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Public-private partnerships are a key source of funding and support for small business, public infrastructure, and aspiring entrepreneurs.  The Honorable Jacques Gansler, head of the Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise at the University of Maryland will deliver the keynote address.  Dr. Gansler will be followed by an expert panel that will discuss how small businesses and public entities can partner together and assess the potential beneficial results of public private partnerships. 

Visit The Program on America and the Global Economy website for more information and to RSVP or send an email (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Please allow for routine security procedures when you arrive at the Center. A photo ID is required for entry.

The Center is located in the southeast wing of the Ronald Reagan Building, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. The closest Metro station is Federal Triangle on the blue and orange lines. For detailed directions, please visit the Center’s website, www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

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Invitation: Small Business is Big Business in America

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The Program on America and the Global Economy and the Kauffman Foundation Present:

Small Business is Big Business in America

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Joseph and Claire Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

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Keynote:

Jeanne Hulit, Acting Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration

Panelists: 

Giovanni Coratolo, Vice President of Small Business Policy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce 

Robert Dilger, Senior Specialist in American National Government, Congressional Research Service

Sean Mallon, Senior Investment Director, Center for Innovative Technology

Shelly Mui-Lipnik, Senior Director of Tax and Financial Services, Biotechnology Industry Organization

Moderator: 

Kent Hughes, Public Policy Scholar and former Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Continuing with our focus on the critical importance of entrepreneurship to the American economy; PAGE will host Jeanne Hulit, Acting Administrator of the SBA, to discuss public policies or private practices could increase the availability of small business financing in the future and innovative businesses that can drive future growth and prosperity. 

A light lunch will be provided from 12:30 – 1:00 p.m. 

Visit The Program on America and the Global Economy website for more information and to RSVP or send an email (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Please allow for routine security procedures when you arrive at the Center. A photo ID is required for entry.

The Center is located in the southeast wing of the Ronald Reagan Building, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. The closest Metro station is Federal Triangle on the blue and orange lines. For detailed directions, please visit the Center’s website, www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

You are invited: The Trans-Pacific Partnership: New Rules for a New Era

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The Program on America and the Global Economy, the Asia Program, the Canada Institute, the Kissinger Institute, the Latin American Program and the Mexico Institute with the support of Wilson Center Senior Scholar William Krist Present:

The Trans-Pacific Partnership: New Rules for a New Era 

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

2:00 – 5:00 pm

Flom Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center


WELCOME and KEYNOTE:

2:00 pm – 2:40 pm

Robert Zoellick, Harvard Belfer Center and  Peterson Institute for International Economics; former president of the World Bank, former United States Deputy Secretary of State and former U.S. Trade Representative

PANEL 1: How the TPP fits into other regional trade agreements.

2:50 pm – 3:50 pm

NAFTA, FTA between Canada and the EU:

  Ari Van Assche, Professor, International Business, HEC Montreal

TTIP:            Michael Geary, Fellow, Wilson Center and Assistant Professor, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

ASEAN:        Roberto Herrera-Lim, Director, Eurasia Group

PANEL 2: Current countries involved in the TPP and what it will take for a successful negotiation.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Australia: Joshua Meltzer, Fellow, Global Economy and Development, Brookings Institution

Vietnam:  Ambassador Nguyen Quoc Cuong, Ambassador of Vietnam to the United States

Chile:       Marcos Robledo, Professor of International Relations and Foreign Policy, Universidad Diego Portales

Moderator:  Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy, Wilson Center


 

Please RSVP (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

The Wilson Center is located in the Ronald Reagan Building at 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW. (Federal Triangle Metro stop on the Blue/ Orange Line) For a map and directions see: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions.  Please bring a photo ID and arrive 15 minutes ahead to allow time for the security checkpoint. 

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly to elizabeth.white@wilsoncenter.org

Event Summary: The Next Generation of Earth System Education

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On Earth Day 2013, Monday, April 22nd, a panel of Geo-science, technology, engineering and mathematics Master Teachers convened at the Wilson Center to discuss several innovative endeavors to engage teachers and students in Earth science studies using state-of-the art technologies and education resources.  The event was co-hosted by the Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE) and the Global Sustainability and Resilience Program.  The event was moderated by Kent Hughes, Director of PAGE.

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John Moore, Director of Geo-science STEM Education at Palmyra Cove Nature Park and Environmental Discovery Center in New Jersey, former Albert Einstein Distinguished Education Fellow, and Executive Director for the American Council of STEM Teachers opened the panel discussion by pointing out two very important and influential opportunities for reform in STEM education: the PCAST Report to the President on plans for improvements in K-12 STEM education released on September 15, 2010 and the recently released Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) report which outlines the new voluntary, rigorous, and internationally benchmarked standards for K-12 science education.  Moore emphasized the importance of, “developing the teachers’ voice,” providing several examples of projects for leadership and professional development of teachers such as the DataStreme Project, a distance learning course designed by the American Meteorological Society,  and Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), a worldwide network for sharing resources for primary and secondary earth science education.

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Marcia Barton spoke next about the opportunities and challenges for STEM educators.  She agreed that the NGSS report provided an opportunity to transform science in the United States by integrating the sciences instead of using current standards of teaching the sciences separately.  The NGSS report also elevated earth and space science, including them more in the proposed curriculum.  The challenges for geo-science, according to Barton, were taking advantage of this increased focus and engaging the students in this material, and training the next generation of teachers.  She proposed starting an academy for innovation and sustainability to engage students in geo-science and engineering, especially with the increase in job opportunities for geoscientists.  Based on President Obama’s initiative to prepare 100,000 new STEM teachers in the next decade, Barton suggested making 30,000 of those earth and space system science teachers.

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Vicky Gorman discussed efforts to promote geo-science education in her community with the Citizen Science Education Program (CSEP).  CSEP was designed by middle school students and tailored for their own community.  The program seeks to increase scientific literacy within the community and is part of the Weather Ready Nation network, a NOAA initiative.  Gorman stressed the importance of communication and leadership skills within students to prepare them for the workforce, with development of those skills starting in middle school.  She stated, “Unless students are marketable, all their education goes to waste.”  Gorman emphasized the importance of geo-science education as it encompasses chemistry, physics, and biology and applies to real-life situations and the global economy and where our workforce needs to be.

Peter Dorofy commented on the technology challenges of teaching earth science.  Traditionally, earth science is a non-lab course but with increasing technological advances such as GPS, GIS, remote sensing, and real-time data, that is changing.  He spoke of the challenges at his technical college in New Jersey, such as budget cuts and shifting programs, and how to make earth science relevant to students who have already chosen a career.  Dorofy stated it was key to identify real-life situations in which earth science can be applied and to take advantage of all the technology in the field to excite students.

John Moore recapped the first part of the panel and reiterated that teachers have a unique opportunity to push earth science.   The problem is in implementation.  Moore stated that in many schools the 1996 NGS Standards are barely implemented today, therefore, the responsibility will lie with the next generation of teachers to ensure that these new standards are realized.

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Kevin Simmons and Jin Kang explained new technology in the geoSTEM field: cubesats, microsatellites, which are powerful, interactive tools that can be used by schools to provide data from space.  Cubesats introduce children to systems engineering and allow them to put the engineering method, which Simmons distinguished from the scientific method, into practice.  Kang emphasized the two essential factors of effective education: motivation and hands-on education which are key to encouraging creativity and innovation.

The panel responded to audience questions about the integrity of the geoSTEM programs, differences between the U.S. and Korean education systems, and the new common core standards and standardized testing.

Drafted by Elizabeth White

Click here to view the video recording of this event.

You are invited: The Next Generation of Earth System Education

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The Program on America and the Global Economy and the Global Sustainability and Resilience Program Present:

The Next Generation of Earth System Education

Monday, April 22, 2013

3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center


Panelists: 

John D. Moore, Albert Einstein Distinguished Education Fellow Emeritus, Director for Geoscience STEM Education, Palmyra Cove Nature Park and Environmental Discovery Center

Marcia Barton, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, NSF, Directorate for Geosciences

Peter Dorofy, NESTA Eastern Regional Director, American Meteorological Society K-12 Distinguished Educator

Vicky Gorman, AMS DataStreme Atmosphere Resource Teacher, GLOBE Program

Kevin Simmons, Albert Einstein Distinguished Education Fellow Emeritus, Senior Policy Analyst, EDJ Associates Inc., Industrial Innovation and Partnerships Division Engineering Directorate, NSF

Jin Kang, Assistant Professor, Aerospace Engineering, U.S. Naval Academy

Moderator: 

Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy


Celebrate Earth Day as a select panel of GeoSTEM Master Teachers discuss how teacher-leaders have come together to put policy into practice.  GeoSTEM is an ongoing educational endeavor to engage teachers and students in an innovative study of Planet Earth using state-of-the-art technologies and educational resources. Through programs such as the American Meteorological Society’s DataStreme Project, the GLOBE Program, and others, teachers are enhancing content knowledge, developing projects, and collaborating in projects that utilize real time and remote sensing data, promote 21st Century Workforce Development Skills, involve the local community and contribute to building the next generation of geoscientists.


Visit The Program on America and the Global Economy website for more information and to RSVP or send an email (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

The Wilson Center is located in the Ronald Reagan Building at 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW. (Federal Triangle Metro stop on the Blue/ Orange Line) For a map and directions see: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions.  Please bring a photo ID and arrive 15 minutes ahead to allow time for the security checkpoint. 

Supply & Safety: Monitoring Imported Food

WWC_page_C_v1On Tuesday, February 5th 2013, the Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE) hosted a discussion about how international trade policy affects the safety standards for imported food. The panel consisted of Lori Wallach, director of the Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch, Ted Poplawski, special assistant to the director on Import Operations and Policy at the FDA, Carmen Stacy, director of Global Issues & Multilateral Affairs at the Grocery Manufacturers Association, and Les Glick, partner at Porter Wright Morris & Arthur. The event was moderated by Kent Hughes, director of the Program on America and the Global Economy at the Wilson Center.

Lori Wallach was the first to present on the topic and began by outlining how current trade agreements, combined with growing food imports, erode the safety standards for imported food. She stated, “Consumer groups did not get into trade; trade agreements invaded food safety policy.” One of the main points that she emphasized was that the World Trade Organization sanitary and phyto-sanitary (“WTO-SPS”) standards for promoting food safety are ineffective. Prior to the formation of the WTO, imported food safety was regulated on a plant by plant basis, which allowed for more quality control. However, under SPS, a WTO country is generally allowed to import food to the US if their sanitary and phyto-sanitary measures are deemed to be “equivalent”. Wallach expressed concern that “equivalence” is very vague and has led to food safety violations and increasingly infrequent USDA spot checks. She invoked the example of the “Chinese Chicken Incident,” in which the WTO stated that the US ban on Chinese poultry was unfair, to show how international trade policy threatens US domestic food safety. Wallach also expressed the view that food safety standards in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) are not stringent enough to protect consumer welfare, especially since the US imports large amounts of seafood from TPP members.

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The next speaker, Carmen Stacy explained the views of the food import industry and its goal to make sure products are safe, while also keeping global supply chains open and flexible. She spoke about the need for transparency in the food import market to make sure that firms and consumers know the origin of the food. Overall, the industry view was largely consistent with current international trade expectations. However, in terms of the TPP, Stacy stated that the food import industry supports a WTO+ food safety policy that is stricter than traditional WTO-SPS standards.

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Ted Poplawski spoke about the FDA’s role in regulating imported foods. He noted that the FDA’s main responsibilities towards imported foods were ensuring food safety and administering correct labeling. Poplawski illustrated that 15-20% of US foods come from foreign countries, including 35% of produce, 60% of spices, and 80% of seafood, while less than 2% is inspected. In addition, the FDA has introduced some new food safety framework rules to protect consumers. The most important are: the Produce Safety Standards, which focuses on identified routes of microbial contamination, and the Preventative Controls for Human Foods, which attempts to ascertain risk to prevent hazards. He also described the Voluntary Qualified Importer Program, which gives FDA approved certification to importers that monitor food safety and perform risk based analysis to reach a certain standard. This newly introduced safety framework could greatly improve the food import situation if enforced properly.

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The final panelist, Les Glick, presented an alarming video about the lack of regulation for imported foods and the threat of contamination. He then went on express his view that China is the number one problem when it comes to imported food safety.

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According to Glick, China’s WTO membership has helped it break into US markets even though it is a known violator of food safety standards. Glick expressed concern that the WTO is hampering the US ability to fully enforce domestic regulation. He pointed to WTO rulings against the US in its attempts to uphold domestic food safety regulations because they  violate the MFN (most favored nation) principle in regards to the SPS standards. Glick stated that it might be a wise idea to take food and agriculture out of the WTO. This would allow countries to enter into bilateral agriculture agreements with their own imported food safety standards and it would also accelerate the Doha round of multilateral trade negotiations, which has been stalled due to disagreements over agricultural trade.

Questions for the panel included clarification over the country of origin labeling (COOL) verdict involving Mexico, Canada and the United States, possible food safety enforcement mechanisms in the TPP, and the issue over how to define a food that is “high risk.”

Posted by Matthew Goldberg

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The Program on America and the Global Economy Presents a Discussion:

Supply & Safety: Monitoring Imported Food

Tuesday, Feb. 5th, 2013

9:30 – 11:00 am

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Panelists:

Lori Wallach, Director, Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch

Ted Poplawski, Special Assistant to the Director on Import Operations and Policy, FDA

Carmen Stacy, Director, Global Issues & Multilateral Affairs, Grocery Manufacturers Association

Les Glick, Partner, Porter Wright Morris & Arthur, Washington, D.C.

Moderator:

Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

According to the USDA, about 15% of all food eaten by Americans is imported. With the growing globalization of our nation’s food supply, imported food safety has become an increasing national concern.  This event will discuss concerns about food imports and the responsibilities of food importers and regulators for the safety of food products grown outside of the United States and their impact on the demand for certain imported products, international food trade patterns, and foreign access to U.S. markets.

Light refreshments and coffee will be provided.

Please RSVP acceptances only to page@wilsoncenter.org

For a map and directions see: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

Please bring photo ID and arrive 15 minutes ahead to allow time for the security checkpoint.

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly to elizabeth.white@wilsoncenter.org

*Media bringing heavy electronic equipment – such as video cameras – MUST indicate this in their response, so they may be cleared through our building security and allowed entrance. Failure to indicate your intention to bring video cameras 24 hours before the event may result in being denied access to the Wilson Center building, please err toward responding if you would like to attend.