You are Invited: Nation Building: The Plan for Public Education in Post-Earthquake Haiti

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The Program on America and the Global Economy Presents:

Nation Building: The Plan for Public Education in Post-Earthquake Haiti 

Thursday, Feb. 7th, 2013

3:00 – 4:30 p.m.

Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.

Washington, DC

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Speakers:

H.E. Vanneur Pierre, Minister of Education, Haiti

Paul G. Vallas, distinguished scholar, Wilson Center, education reform expert and lead education consultant to the

Government of Haiti

Moderator: 

Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy


Nearly 50% of the Haitian population is under the age of 18. Thus restructuring Haiti’s education system is the Government of Haiti’s top priority, a challenge complicated by the devastating 2010 earthquake. The Haitian Minister of Education, along with U.S. education reform expert Paul G. Vallas, share the details, the challenges, the progress and the need to realize Haiti’s vision for its future through education.


 

Please RSVP acceptances only to page@wilsoncenter.org

Directions to the Wilson Center: www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

Watch the live webcast here

Please bring a photo ID and arrive 15 minutes ahead to allow time for a security checkpoint.

 

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly to elizabeth.white@wilsoncenter.org

*Media bringing heavy electronic equipment – such as video cameras – MUST indicate this in their response, so they may be cleared through our building security and allowed entrance. Failure to indicate your intention to bring video cameras 24 hours before the event may result in being denied access to the Wilson Center building, please err toward responding if you would like to attend.

 

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The Program on America and the Global Economy Presents a Discussion:

Supply & Safety: Monitoring Imported Food

Tuesday, Feb. 5th, 2013

9:30 – 11:00 am

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

Panelists:

Lori Wallach, Director, Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch

Ted Poplawski, Special Assistant to the Director on Import Operations and Policy, FDA

Carmen Stacy, Director, Global Issues & Multilateral Affairs, Grocery Manufacturers Association

Les Glick, Partner, Porter Wright Morris & Arthur, Washington, D.C.

Moderator:

Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

According to the USDA, about 15% of all food eaten by Americans is imported. With the growing globalization of our nation’s food supply, imported food safety has become an increasing national concern.  This event will discuss concerns about food imports and the responsibilities of food importers and regulators for the safety of food products grown outside of the United States and their impact on the demand for certain imported products, international food trade patterns, and foreign access to U.S. markets.

Light refreshments and coffee will be provided.

Please RSVP acceptances only to page@wilsoncenter.org

For a map and directions see: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

Please bring photo ID and arrive 15 minutes ahead to allow time for the security checkpoint.

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly to elizabeth.white@wilsoncenter.org

*Media bringing heavy electronic equipment – such as video cameras – MUST indicate this in their response, so they may be cleared through our building security and allowed entrance. Failure to indicate your intention to bring video cameras 24 hours before the event may result in being denied access to the Wilson Center building, please err toward responding if you would like to attend.

Kent Hughes discussing the ‘fiscal cliff’ with LA Times

Deputy business editor Joe Bel Bruno and economy reporter Don Lee talk with Kent H. Hughes, director of the Program on America and the Global Economy at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Find more fiscal cliff stories at http://www.latimes.com/business

Wilson Center Policy Brief Series: Manufacturing Matters, Strengthening America: Inventing the Future

The Wilson Center recently released two essays by Kent Hughes, Director of the Program on America and the Global Economy, in its series of policy briefs on critical issues which will run from now until Inauguration Day.
 

Manufacturing Matters

Manufacturing plays a key role in the U.S. economy and will continue to do so. The private sector provides roughly 70 percent of total U.S. spending on research and development, and the bulk of that amount comes from manufacturing enterprises. Manufacturing generates 90 percent of U.S. patents. It also is central to the system that translates laboratory research into commercial products, thus generating jobs and creating wealth. Manufacturing also constitutes the single most important export sector of the economy and is thus critical to America’s ability to pay its way in the international economy. Finally, manufacturing generates millions of jobs, which provide pay and benefits that exceed the national average. Looking ahead, the United States needs a manufacturing strategy that can support the emergence of advanced manufacturing processes that, in conjunction with low-cost energy, can revitalize the U.S. manufacturing sector.

>> Read the Policy Brief in its Entirety

Strengthening America: Inventing the Future

The U.S. innovation system has enormous strengths, including public and private support for research and development, the world’s best university system, and an entrepreneurial risk-taking culture. But those elements of the system now face several domestic and international challenges. In the United States, cuts in federal spending could reduce support for university research. The kindergarten through 12th grade (K–12) education system struggles to keep pace with the rising demands of the 21st-century workplace. Internationally, the United States now faces competition to attract or keep advanced manufacturing firms, research facilities, and top scientific talent. The United States will need to maintain support for research and development (R&D), improve its education system, and learn from best practices around the world.

>> Read the Policy Brief in its Entirety

Making a Success of Every School

The Wilson Center and the Program on America and the Global Economy are proud to share a recently released publication on U.S. education reform:

Paul Vallas, distinguished scholar and noted education reformer, identifies the main challenges facing U.S. education in the 21st century.  He notes that US performance on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) ranks American 15 year olds as 17th in science and 25th in mathematics.  Vallas and others stress that American schools have not declined.  Rather it is a case of technology, a changing job market, and rising international competition demanding much more of America’s educational system.  Attracting and retaining top teachers is vitally important, but Vallas stresses that one cannot neglect early childhood education, school improvement-focused state and district governance, and a 21st century curriculum.

Click here to access the full report

Press Release–New National Poll: Americans Still Want to be Homeowners

New National Poll: Americans Still Want to be Homeowners

Americans Back Government Support to Preserve 30-Year Mortgages

 

WASHINGTON – A new survey by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars finds that despite the bursting of the housing bubble, an overwhelming majority of Americans still feel that homeownership is both important to them and a part of the American Dream. A majority also said homeownership should be a national priority.

Despite the importance placed upon homeownership, however, more than 40% of respondents also said the federal government was too involved in developing policies to assist with homeownership. Only 29% of respondents favored the removal of the federal government from mortgage financing when they were informed that this would increase the cost of home loans and eliminate the availability of 30-year mortgages.

Respondents also had unfavorable views of mortgage institutions Fannie Mae and Freddy Mac.

To view or download a copy of the survey results in graph form, click here.

To view the survey results in full, click here.

Notes to Editors

  1. This survey was conducted as part of a conference on that status of homeownership after the 2008 housing bubble burst and current American attitudes towards homeownership. Various stakeholders spoke about the housing market and consumer attitudes, including keynote presentations by Sen. Bob Corker, ranking member of the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Protection, and Jim Millstein, former chief restructuring officer at the U.S. Treasury Department. For a full schedule of the day’s events and video of the keynote presentations, click here.
  2. These key findings are based on telephone interviews with N=1,000 registered “likely” voters nationally. Responses to this survey were gathered May 13-15, 2012, and the confidence interval associated with a sample of this type is + 3.1%.
  3. The Wilson Center provides a strictly nonpartisan space for the worlds of policymaking and scholarship to interact. By conducting relevant and timely research and promoting dialogue from all perspectives, it works to address the critical current and emerging challenges confronting the United States and the world.

Contact: Drew Sample

Phone: (202) 691-4379

drew.sample@wilsoncenter.org

Posted by: PAGE staff

Introducing PAGE’s Twitter Feed

Nearly 18 months after introducing the blog, America and the Global Economy, the Program on America and the Global Economy of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is proud to announce it has increased its social media presence by joining the ranks of twitter as well.  To find out the latest in innovation policy, STEM education, entrepreneurship, and a whole host of other issues come visit us at @PAGEeconomy early and often.  Fear not, as we will of course still maintain a robust blogging presence in addition to the new twitter feed.  But for those of you who like your updates strictly in 140 characters or less, this is a great way to find out what we’re up to!

Posted by: PAGE Staff