Flipping Classrooms

Using new technology in the classroom to improve learning outcomes has long been established.  Using these new technologies to flip the whole teaching process, however, is quite the novel concept.

The idea of a flipped classroom incorporates the use of iPads for teachers to deliver recorded lectures for the students to watch on their own time as homework.  This leaves more class time for questions and solving homework problems. The reversed method of teaching provides teachers with more one-on-one time with students to address specific questions.

This technique has proved especially useful for math and science classes.  A Chemistry teacher at Jamestown High School, Colorado, Tom Warner, has taken to loading his lectures  and chemistry related apps and games onto iPads for the students while maintaining complete control of the iPad’s content.  Mr. Warner’s strategy has been met with student approval and success, “It’s a more efficient use of class time. We can watch the videos on our own time, and go back and re-watch them if we need to,” student Miss Andino commented.

This method has not been met with universal acclaim however.  Issues involving internet accessibility in low-income areas and the model’s emphasis on lecturing have arisen.  Despite these concerns, Stacey Roshan’s Advanced Placement Calculus class is testament to a flipped classroom’s success.  Ms. Roshan covers the material in less time and has seen more students achieving 5’s, the highest mark possible, on the advanced placement Exam.  Commenting in USA Today, Ms. Roshan said, “In an English class, you send the kids home to read a passage, and then in class you discuss that passage. Why in math class am I more or less having them read the passage in class?”

Posted by: Georgina Ellison

Sources: The Post-Journal, USA Today

Photo Credit: CHEW2377 courtesy of flickr user Trinity College, University of Melbourne

You are Invited – Book Discussion: World Under Pressure

The Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE)

Presents a Book Launch:

World Under Pressure:

How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

Featuring:  Author, Carl Dahlman, Henry R. Luce Associate Professor

School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Moderated by: Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Carl J. Dahlman is an Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at the World Bank. At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching explore how the rise of the BRICs are affecting global power, and  how rapid advances in science, technology and information are influencing the growth prospects of nations  and economic relations in a rapidly globalizing world. At the World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as Senior Advisor to the World Bank Institute and managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) Program starting in 1999. He has conducted extensive analytical work on major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has co-authored eight books on the development strategy of different countries and many chapters and articles on competitiveness, education and skills, and innovation.  His newest book is The World under Pressure: How China and India are influencing the Global Economy and Environment, published by Stanford University Press in the Fall of 2011. He is currently doing research on the global innovation system which provides a broad perspective on the forces shaping competition and cooperation across nations including governments, transnational corporations, and universities.  Dr. Dahlman earned a B.A, magna cum laude from the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University (1972) and a PhD in economics from Yale University (1979).

Friday, December 9, 2011   3:00-4:30 pm.

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

RSVP (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Posted by: PAGE Staff

You are Invited – Doing Business in a More Transparent World: A Discussion of the 2012 World Bank Report

The Program on America and the Global Economy

invites you to a panel discussion:

DOING BUSINESS IN A MORE TRANSPARENT WORLD:

A Discussion of the 2012 World Bank Report

with

Augusto Lopez-Claros

Director, Global Indicators and Analysis, World Bank-IFC

Commentators

Peter Bakvis, Director, Washington Office of the International Trade Union Confederation; Johnny Moloto, Deputy Chief of Mission, South African Embassy; Frank Vargo, Vice President of International Economic Affairs, National Association of Manufacturers

Moderated by: John Sewell, Senior Scholar, Wilson Center

Every year since 2002, the World Bank’s Doing Business Project has released a report ranking the world’s economies. This highly influential report is used by policy makers and business leaders to create economic regulations and strategies in countries around the globe. What are the benefits and drawbacks to the World Bank’s approach? How does the report support innovation and entrepreneurship? What type of guidance is given to developing and emerging economies? What are the short- and long-term implications of the report’s recommendations? Join a panel of business, labor, and economic experts on December 6 for a careful and critical examination of this year’s report, Doing Business in a More Transparent World.  The report is available online at www.doingbusiness.org

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 – 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Sixth Floor Board Room, Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W.

Please respond with acceptances only to PAGE@wilsoncenter.org.

Posted by: PAGE Staff

You are Invited – World Under Pressure: How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

The Program on America and the Global Economy (PAGE)

Presents a Book Launch:

World Under Pressure:

How China and India are Influencing the Global Economy and Environment

Featuring:  Author, Carl Dahlman, Henry R. Luce Associate Professor

School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Moderated by: Kent Hughes, Director, Program on America and the Global Economy

Carl J. Dahlman is an Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  He joined Georgetown in January 2005 after more than 25 years of distinguished service at the World Bank. At Georgetown, Dr. Dahlman’s research and teaching explore how the rise of the BRICs are affecting global power, and  how rapid advances in science, technology and information are influencing the growth prospects of nations  and economic relations in a rapidly globalizing world. At the World Bank Dr. Dahlman served as Senior Advisor to the World Bank Institute and managed the Knowledge for Development (K4D) Program starting in 1999. He has conducted extensive analytical work on major developing countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. He has co-authored eight books on the development strategy of different countries and many chapters and articles on competitiveness, education and skills, and innovation.  His newest book is The World under Pressure: How China and India are influencing the Global Economy and Environment, published by Stanford University Press in the Fall of 2011. He is currently doing research on the global innovation system which provides a broad perspective on the forces shaping competition and cooperation across nations including governments, transnational corporations, and universities.  Dr. Dahlman earned a B.A, magna cum laude from the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University (1972) and a PhD in economics from Yale University (1979).

Friday, December 9, 2011   3:00-4:30 pm.

5th Floor Conference Room, Woodrow Wilson Center

RSVP (acceptances only) to page@wilsoncenter.org

Posted by: PAGE Staff

Leading the World in Innovation

While multiple indices have shown varying results regarding U.S. innovation, a new study by Thomson Reuters shows that American companies are among the most innovative firms worldwide. This report, The Top 100 Global Innovators, outlines the top 100 firms worldwide with the highest track records of innovation investment, global influence, and intellectual property protection.

Of the 100 companies determined to be the top innovators, 40 are American companies. The largest segment of those 40 companies is focused on semiconductor and electrical component manufacturing. Chemical, healthcare product, telecommunications equipment, pharmaceutical, aerospace and computer hardware manufacturing sectors were also represented amongst the 40 American companies. After the United States, Japan was second on the list, with 27 firms, and France came in third with 11 firms.

In order to make this claim the report relied on a multitude of international patent data.  The criterion used were the amount of patents, the success with which patent applications were granted, the degree to which these patents were recognized in the largest markets in the global economy, and the degree to which these patents were cited by subsequent patent applicants.  The report notes, “This designation proves that companies that invest in innovation, and protect and enforce their intellectual assets, are significantly more likely to contribute to economic growth, both within their organizations and the nations in which they reside.”

Posted by: Rebecca Anderson

Sources: Thomson Reuters

Photo Credit: Invenzioni [Inventions] courtesy of flickr user maxgiani

Business Model Innovation

The Alliance for Global Good has created a fund specifically for non-profits and philanthropic organizations with innovative and unique business models. The idea came from a Chicago enterprise, “Sweet Beginnings” that provided ex-convicts with the opportunity to earn income through beekeeping, along with food handling, retail sales, inventory and distribution.  Traditionally, non-profit organizations rely on individual donations for income, but the Alliance for the Global Good’s Innovation Fund encourages organizations to implement innovative business strategies. ”With the right business model, organizations could really thrive,” said David Brand, president and chief executive of the alliance.

The new fund is intended to help both established and startup charities. Grant winners will also be expected to mentor future fund recipients. Michelle Singletary of The Washington Post said, “[T]he focus on finding new ways to support human service organizations…these groups are going to have to start thinking about how their programs can be sustainable during economic downturns.”

It’s not just non-profit organizations that have fought the challenges of the economy and demand for innovation. Mars’ M&M chocolate candy brand created custom print M&M’s after the company launched ‘Pioneer Week’ back in 2003, providing teams with small budgets and 90 days to build a product for trial production. Today, My M&M’s are in high demand for weddings, party favors and other events, yielding a large profit.

A study conducted by the Boston Consulting Group and BusinessWeek found that Business model innovators continued to flourish against competition, even 10 years after implementation. While business model innovation implies a great deal of risk-taking, sometimes it can provide the most fruitful path. As noted in the title of the report,  “When the Game Gets Tough, Change the Game”.

Posted by: Georgina Ellison

Sources: Boston Consulting Group, BusinessWeek, The Washington Post

Photo Credit: Light my path courtesy of flickr user faith goble

You are Invited – Beyond our Means: Why America Spends While the World Saves

The Program on America and the Global Economy

invites you to a book discussion:

Beyond Our Means: Why America Spends While the World Saves

with author

Sheldon Garon

Professor of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University, and former Wilson Center Fellow

Moderated by

Kent Hughes

Director of Program on America and the Global Economy, Wilson Center

If the financial crisis has taught us anything, it is that Americans save too little, spend too much, and borrow excessively. What can we learn from East Asian and European countries that have fostered enduring cultures of thrift over the past two centuries?  Many economists believe people save according to universally rational calculations, saving the most in their middle years as they plan for retirement, and saving the least in welfare states. In reality, Europeans save at high rates despite generous welfare programs and aging populations. Americans save little, despite weaker social safety nets and a younger population. Tracing the development of such behaviors across three continents from the nineteenth century to today, Beyond Our Means highlights the role of institutions in shaping habits of saving and spending, and reveals why some nations save so much and others so little.

Friday, December 2, 2011, 1:00pm – 2:30 p.m.

Sixth Floor Moynihan Board Room   Woodrow Wilson Center

Please RSVP acceptances only to page@wilsoncenter.org.

Posted by: PAGE Staff